Catching illegal immigrants on UT campus (story of the week)

The UT chapter of the Texas Young Conservatives is attracting national attention (and scrutiny) since Monday’s announcement of their “Catch an Illegal Immigrant” event. The event, scheduled for today, invited all UT students to seek and capture “illegal immigrants” hiding around campus in exchange for $25 gift cards. In light of the subsequent media firestorm, the event has been cancelled.

Lorenzo Garcia, the event’s organizer and Chairman of the UT Young Conservatives, issued this public statement about the event’s cancellation. It cites fear of University backlash and concerns for volunteer safety as factors in the decision to scrap the event. Garcia, a former Abbott staffer and current UT student, faces excessive vilification, and harassment from friends and opponents alike.

The event was vulgar, demeaning, and indelicate. I found it offensive, and many other people did too. But is that a good enough reason to call it off? Probably not. Is it a good enough reason to send obscenity-laced death threats to a student’s personal social media accounts? Again, probably not. This was a misguided student organization’s botched publicity stunt, not a discriminatory piece of legislation our an outrageous court ruling. I value my right to speak freely, and it would be hypocritical not to value the Texas Young Conservative’s and Garcia’s right to do the same. If they were making policy, that would be a different story.

And with that, I direct your attention to the real story of the week. (via the Texas Tribune)

Wendy Davis–Why I stood up for Texas women

A few days ago Texas State Senator Wendy Davis wrote this piece for the Washington Post explaining her recent filibuster in the Texas Senate, and I couldn’t agree with her more. It’s the perfect blend of frustration with current Texas government, hard-hitting facts, and hope for the future of a lady-friendly Lonestar State, all wrapped up in the powerful language of a very powerful woman. I’ve posted it in it’s entirety here:

Washington Post 

Why I stood up for Texas women
By Wendy R. Davis, Published: July 15

Texas State Sen. Wendy Davis represents District 10 of the Texas Senate.

Texas state leaders have again taken up a partisan effort to impose severe restrictions on the ability of women in our state to receive reproductive and other crucial health-care services. Just a few weeks ago, I spent nearly 13 hours filibustering this bill. I stood up to filibuster the bill because Texas Republican leaders would rather pursue a partisan agenda than help Texas women. I stood to oppose the bill because it rolled back constitutional rights and would reduce the number of women’s health clinics from 42 to 5, thereby threatening the health and safety of thousands of Texas women.

I know how important this is because as a young woman, the only health care I received — preventative care, cancer screenings, checkups, etc. — came from a women’s health clinic close to where I live in Fort Worth. Indeed, more than 90 percent of the care provided by these centers has nothing at all to do with abortion. Quite the opposite, their services are absolutely critical to preventing unplanned pregnancies and to providing much-needed health-care screening.

So while the “people’s filibuster” will go down in history for putting a stop (if only temporarily) to a misguided bill, the filibuster was more than organized opposition or even endurance — it was an expression of mainstream Texans standing up against partisan power-mongers who no longer act in Texas’ best interest or even tell Texans the truth. These partisans have depicted their bill as an effort to improve the quality of care available to women in local clinics. However, the filibuster exposed their real intent — to close clinics all over the state of Texas and deny health-care services to thousands of Texas women. And now Gov. Rick Perry and Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst have rammed these new restrictions through the state legislature in a special session, without concern for health care or constitutionality.

This partisan effort builds on a concerted action by state leaders to roll back access to women’s and family health care. In 2011, their budget cuts threw approximately 150,000 women out of a health safety net that, as in my experience, served as their only source of regular, reliable care. Since then, state leaders have bypassed a nine-to-one federal match in funding for the women’s health-care program and saddled state taxpayers with approximately $30 million per year in unnecessary expense, as well as millions of additional dollars spent through Medicaid on unplanned births. Worse, a vendetta against Planned Parenthood by Gov. Perry and Lt. Gov. Dewhurst has gutted nearly half of the state’s women’s health-care delivery system. As a consequence, tens of thousands of Texas women may very well have no providers of care despite additional state funding.

There has been a great deal of attention given to the portion of the bill that would ban abortions after the 20th week of pregnancy, which was added by partisans primarily as a means for whipping up their political base. But this cynical and dishonest political tactic puts women’s lives at risk. Less than 1 percent of all abortions in Texas occur at the 20th week or later. In nearly all of these cases, a family in tragic circumstances has had to make the difficult and private decision to let go of a much-wanted pregnancy because of a major medical concern. What’s more, state leaders don’t mention that they opposed and defeated an amendment to allow an exception to the 20-week ban when a woman has been raped or is the victim of incest. This exception is no small matter. Each year, about 25,000 American women — 30 percent of them minors — become pregnant through rape or incest.

In the end, the filibuster was a means to continue the fight and stand up to Republican leaders. That fight is not a new one for me. As a senator from the only true swing district in the Texas Senate, I’ve been targeted by the GOP for my outspoken criticism of their extremist attacks on public education and voting rights, to name just two examples. My nearly 13-hour stand against the effort to deny women access to basic health care evolved into a people’s filibuster opposing a selfish and out-of-touch leadership that refuses to listen to real families with real hopes.

Texas really is the greatest state in the greatest nation. Texans — and women all over the country — deserve leaders that care, that listen and that work to protect their interests. The people’s filibuster demonstrated that Texans — and women everywhere — are ready and willing to fight back.

I stand with Wendy Davis and Texas Women. If you do too, consider supporting her campaign online here.

I stand with Texas women

I can’t rally with the hundreds of strong women and men fighting for women’s rights in the Texas Capitol, but I did share my story with Senator Wendy Davis to support her efforts to filibuster SB5 tomorrow:

My name is Jessica, I’m a Texan. I was born in Corpus Christi and I graduated from Vista Ridge Highschool in Cedar Park, just a few minutes north of Austin up 183. I was raised on Dublin Dr. Pepper and Friday night football, and I’m proud of the world-class education I’m getting right here at home at the University of Texas at Austin.

I am a Texas woman, and I am a woman of God. My faith informs me that all life is sacred, but my constitution informs me that what goes on between me, my uterus, and my God, is none of your damn business. My female reproductive system is not within your jurisdiction to govern because you are not the voice of God, you are the voice of the people, and the people say no to SB5.

If you’re with us, share yours too.

Tune in on Twitter tomorrow to lend your virtual support!

P.S.: Read this Texas Tribune Article to get caught up on how it all started, and check out these pictures from the abortion debate at the Texas Capitol.